Click to Home
Home
EmailPrint
Go To Search

Legal Notices

Posted on: June 27, 2018

City Council Minutes: 6/12/2018

Brookings City Council
June 12, 2018

The Brookings City Council held a meeting on Tuesday, June 12, 2018 at 6:00 p.m., at City Hall with the following City Council members present: Mayor Keith Corbett, Council Members Mary Kidwiler, Dan Hansen, Holly Tilton Byrne, Nick Wendell, Patty Bacon, and Ope Niemeyer. City Manager Jeff Weldon, incoming City Manager Paul Briseno, City Attorney Steve Britzman, and City Clerk Shari Thornes were also present.

6:00 PM Regular Meeting
Consent Agenda. A motion was made by Council Member Hansen, seconded by Council Member Kidwiler, to approve the Consent Agenda. The motion carried by the following vote: Yes: 7 - Corbett, Niemeyer, Hansen, Kidwiler, Bacon, Wendell, and Tilton Byrne.
3.A. Action to approve the agenda.
3.B. Action to approve the May 22, 2018 City Council Minutes.
3.C. Action on Resolution 18-044, a Resolution concerning Tax Incremental District Number Seven Project Plan.
Resolution 18-044 - Resolution Concerning Tax Incremental District
Number Seven Project Plan

Whereas, the City of Brookings adopted Resolution No. 16-14, A Resolution Providing for the Creation of Tax Incremental District Number Seven and Resolution No. 17-14, A
Resolution Approving Tax Incremental District Number Seven Project Plan, on February
11, 2014; and

Whereas, the Tax Incremental District Seven Project Plan included eligible project costs of $7,355,000 which are sufficient to complete the improvements as outlined in the
Project Plan provided the project costs are re-allocated in accordance with SDCL 11-9-14 to permit the City of Brookings to expend the eligible project costs; and

Whereas, eligible project costs of a Tax Increment Project Plan may be reallocated during the five years from the creation of the TIF District as described in the Project
Plan.

Now, Therefore, It Is Hereby Resolved that the sum of $7,355,000 be allocated as
Discretionary Costs in Tax Incremental District Number Seven Project Plan to permit the
City of Brookings to expend the funds to complete the Project as set forth in the Project
Plan.
3.D. Action on Resolution 18-045, a Resolution revising the term of Promissory Note for SDSU Performing Arts Center Financial Commitment.
Resolution 18-045 - A Resolution Revising the Term of Promissory Note for SDSU
Performing Arts Center Financial Commitment

Whereas, the City of Brookings and O. Dale Larson, of Brookings, executed a
Promissory Note on June 15, 2017, to provide financing for the City of Brookings’ financial commitment to the SDSU Performing Arts Center, and

Whereas, the parties to the above-described Promissory Note have agreed to modify and revise the repayment schedule from Ten (10) years to Five (5) years,

Now, Therefore, Be It Resolved by the City of Brookings as follows:
1. The City of Brookings hereby determines the above-described Promissory Note issued to Dale O. Larson shall be amended to reduce the repayment schedule from Ten
(10) years to Five (5) years; and
2. The City Manager, City Clerk and Finance Director are hereby authorized to execute the revised Promissory Note on behalf of the City of Brookings.
3.E. Action on Resolution 18-046, a Resolution awarding a contract for the installation of new playground equipment and surfacing off of the National Joint Powers Alliance for the Parks & Recreation Dept. (Southside Park and Pioneer Park).
Resolution 18-046 - Resolution Awarding a Contract for the Installation of New Playground Equipment and Surfacing for Southside Park and Pioneer Park

Whereas, the City of Brookings has sought and received the following quote for playground equipment, rubber tiled surfacing and installation from the National Joint
Powers Alliance – Little Tikes and Sof’Surfaces Contract and Crouch Recreation.
Company Playground Equipment, Surfacing & Installation: total amount of $254,029.55
The Parks capital budget for this expenditure is $255,000.

Now Therefore, Be It Resolved that the contract from Crouch Recreation in the amount of $254,029.55 be accepted.

New Human Resources Director. Maggie Owens, new City Human Resources Director, was introduced to the City Council and public.

New City Manager. Paul Briseno, new City Manager, was introduced to the public.

Mayor’s State of the City Address. Mayor Corbett presented his annual State of the City Message.

“Let us not forget those who came before us as we look to the future!

The Veterans Memorial reminds me of all who have come before us and have given so much to make Brookings what it is today. In addition to our Veterans, we need to remember the leaders and community members who had the foresight to move Brookings to the north from Medary to take advantage of the railroad. Additionally, we are blessed to have so many who have given and continue to give of their time, talent, and treasures.

The South Main Fire Station serves as a reminder that we must continue to look to and plan for the future. It reminds me of all our great volunteers, in this case, the Fire Department. Men and women who committed 10,550 hours this past year to train to protect us and our property.

What would happen if we had a full-time fire department? We wouldn’t have 35-40 people showing up at each call, but we would have to add at least $2 million to the city’s budget. Please thank these firefighters, police officers, and reserve members if you see them. These great people help make Brookings grow.

Brookings County Workforce. On any given day there are between 500-1,000 job openings in Brookings County. On May 9, 2018 there were 719 openings: 304 general labor positions, 154 skilled positions, 98 professional positions, 96 retail/service positions, 37 office positions, and 30 student/interns. One element needed for adding workers is housing. Many workers can’t find housing they deem affordable, so they don’t move to Brookings, they move away. New housing developments in Aurora and Volga are helping with this concern.

Workforce Development. Brookings Economic Development Corporation continues to work with businesses coming to Brookings as well as expanding current businesses. This past year, 21 new businesses opened in Brookings with 16 current businesses expanded.

Unemployment Rate. The most recent unemployment rate is 3.2%, a change from last year at this time of 2.8%. We are continuing to address this.

Building Permits. The year 2016 was an outstanding year for building permits. In December 2016, a large number of building permits were taken out for work to be completed in 2017. There were 54 single-family homes, 10 townhouse units, and 22 apartment units constructed in 2017. As of the end of May 2018, there have been 130 building permits issued for a total of $14,835,655.60. The building permits breakdown is: two apartments, 23 commercial, 26 new homes, and the remainder for remodeling and adding additions to homes.

Gross Receipts Taxable Sales. Gross Revenue for Brookings continues to be the envy of other communities. Dining places continues to be a dominate source of gross sales tax for Brookings.

General Taxable Sales. General taxable sales for 2017: $18.7M for construction (up 4.7%); $79.7M for manufacturing (up 16.1%); $356.3M for retail (down 0.7%); and $99.5M for services (up 7.8%).

Construction Taxable Sales. If you know people building, encourage them to have their building products delivered to Brookings, or purchase their products locally.

Retail Taxable Sales. So far in 2018, retail taxable sales are up 0.3%. This is an area we need to continue to work on.

We ended 2017 with sales tax revenue being 3.56% ($229,026) over budget for the first penny; 1.94% ($31,149) over budget for the 25% second penny; and 2.42% ($117,605) over budget for the 75% second penny. As of the end of May 2018, the first penny is 6.07% over last year at this time. The 25% of the second penny is 6.13% over this time last year, and the 75% of the second penny is 6.08% over last year at this time. Sales revenue is up 2.1% resulting in revenue slightly ahead of expenditures. Why does this matter? If you talk to someone from another community, we have great parks, great streets, and protection by law enforcement and fire departments. Brookings has the best of many things. If we don’t have these sales tax dollars, a lot of these great things would have to stop. Thank you for shopping local.

The third penny fund was .94% over last year and ended up 7.25% ($63,056) over budget. The latest figures show the 3B revenue is up from last year-to-date by just less than one percent.

What is so special about Brookings? There are so many great things about Brookings, it could easily consume a full day speaking to all the great things about our home. Population is 23,985, up 8.3% since the last census with an average 4-5% increase per year. We have 8,429 households and an Aa3 Bond Rating. We have healthy, but not excessive, reserves. The enterprise funds/businesses are well run. The best thing about Brookings is the people. They are committed to Brookings.

Brookings is the #1 best place to live in SD – Niche, 2018, 2017, 2016. Brookings is the #2 safest city in SD – Alarms, org 218. Brookings is the #2 best School District in SD – Niche, 2017. Brookings is in the Top 10 Best Small Towns in America – Livability. Brookings is one of the best cities for entrepreneurs – Livability / Entrepreneur, 2017. Brookings is the #1 safest college town in America – Safewise. Brookings is the #1 best and safest place to live in SD – Movoto.

Brookings is one of five micropolitans in the Heartland outperforming the nation by the Walton Family Foundation (May 2018). The Walton Family Foundation said the following about Brookings: “This location is home to street-savvy entrepreneurs, a highly educated workforce, a university churning out graduates for local companies, academic entrepreneurs establishing tech companies, access to early-stage risk capital, bioscience firms, and advanced manufacturing operating in a networked ecosystem.”

What is special about Brookings? There are many elements that identify Brookings as a special place. Here are a few:
• Dedicated and knowledgeable staff, department heads;
• Commitment to strategic planning with the Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) & Community Resource Plan (CRP), 5-year and 10-year;
• Completion of the Comp Plan 2040;
• Commitment to a balanced budget;
• Brookings Market Space;
• Vision Brookings; and
• Strong and knowledgeable BEDC, CVB and Chamber.

Vision Brookings. A $258M commitment positioning Brookings for future growth and development.

Brookings Economic Development Corporation. BEDC is operated by four individuals who do so many things for our community; from workforce development, workforce programs, business development, and entrepreneurial studies.

Convention Visitors Bureau. This staff of four supported 53 events in 2017, including 24 new events, with an average return-on-investment of $81.34. One event in particular stands out. Downtown at Sundown. This event averaged 848 people per week, for a total of 5,939 people over the 7 weeks. Sgt Rock, which will kick off DTSD this year, had the highest attendance of 1,105.

Brookings Chamber of Commerce. Another great team of four individuals had a great year hosting 21 ribbon cuttings, 18 open houses, the Business Expo, along with Legislative and Candidate Forums, Leadership Brookings, and LEAD Seminars.

What else makes Brookings Special? The people. Whenever something needs to be accomplished, we can be confident the community will show up and commit to the project. The individuals who serve on the city’s volunteer boards, committees, and commissions are just a few of those individuals.

With all the great things going on in Brookings, there are still opportunities to continue to grow, while staying true to our mission: The city of Brookings is committed to providing a high quality of life for its citizens and fostering a diverse economic base through innovative thinking, strategic planning, and proactive, fiscally responsible municipal management.

Opportunities. It is not the City Council, nor city staff that make all things possible in Brookings. It is the people of Brookings that make these opportunities happen.
• Affordable Housing. The Affordable Housing Task Force report has been completed and can be found on the City Website. The Task Force is working on an RFP for a possible Affordable Housing Development.
• Child/Adult Care. The availability of child and elder care continue to be an issue which continues to hamper individuals from applying for jobs.
• Workforce development/training. Workforce development and training is being addressed by the BEDC and Vision Brookings Retail Growth. As the Walton Foundation noted, one of the strengths of Brookings is continuing with entrepreneurial growth. This is aided by the emphasis provided by BEDC and Vision Brookings. Emphasis is being given to this topic in the middle school by Jennifer Quail (BEDC), which has been expanded to the Boys & Girls Club too.
• Retail Growth. This is where the sales tax strong growth stems from. The niche shops downtown and Joann Fabrics provide a great draw for out-of-town shoppers.
• Continuing with the Entrepreneurial growth.
• Continue Master Planning.
• Interchange at 20th Street South and I-29. This interchange is crucial to keep our community growing. We are missing out on growth for Brookings. A number of workers live on the south side of Brookings and commute to the area east of the interstate daily. There are Aurora Community members commuting to Brookings on a daily basis. The location of our schools, and growing student population. With an average of 11,058 vehicles per day traveling through the intersection of 6th St. and 22nd Ave., the demands on that intersection need to be addressed.
• Continue commitment to Mental Health. Transitional Housing is one way, along with the Mental Health Task Force. We must continue the discussion on mental health in our community.
• Campus and Community Relationship. Our strong campus-community working relationship is envied by other communities.
• Brookings Market Place (BMP). The BMP is moving forward and will be a significant tax infusion to our community.

Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy. We must follow our strategy for economic development and growth to survive and prosper. This is possible by following these five elements of our strategy:
• Smart and Balanced Growth. Informed decision making and thoughtful processes are the guidepost for future growth and development.
• Economic Prosperity. We must create household business and community wealth.
• Competitive Business Environment. Assemble the resources and amenities that allow businesses to flourish.
• High Quality Community. Create an environment and amenities that establish the community as a “people destination.”
• High Performance Community. Develop Brookings County and communities as role models in all aspects of “community.”

Opportunities. Evolving economic growth and community improvement strategy. Strategic coordination between Brookings County, Brookings School District, BEDC, City of Brookings, and SDSU. We are missing a Welcome Center or Kiosk. We need an RV Park; another opportunity presented for an individual to develop.

Celebration of Gratitude. Every day, thank those who have given and continue to give of their time, talent, and treasures. I emphasized this in my presentation last year and throughout the year whenever I visited with people. We have so much to be thankful for in Brookings, that we need to continue to thank those who give so much of their time, talent, and in many cases, treasures.

Thank you City Manager Jeff Weldon, staff, and departments, City Clerk Shari Thornes, Laurie and Bonnie, Volunteer Board Members, BEDC, CVB, Chamber of Commerce, Brookings citizens, and fellow Council Members. Without you, Brookings would not be where it is today.”

Resolution 18-043. A motion was made by Council Member Kidwiler, seconded by Council Member Hansen, that Resolution 18-043, a Resolution Amending Resolution 17-063 and Pertaining to the Terms of the Exchange of Real Property and Expenditure of Funds for the Acquisition of Real Property for the City & County Government Center, be approved. The motion carried by the following vote: Yes: 7 - Niemeyer, Hansen, Kidwiler, Wendell, Bacon, Tilton Byrne, and Corbett.

Ordinance 18-009. A public hearing was held on Ordinance 18-009, an Ordinance rezoning the West 199’ of the East 451’, excluding the South 33’ of Lot 1, Block 1, Christie Springs Addition from Residence R-1D Single-Family to Residence R-3 Apartment District (Fox Run Addition). A motion was made by Council Member Hansen, seconded by Council Member Tilton Byrne, that Ordinance 18-009 be approved. The motion carried by the following vote: Yes: 7 - Niemeyer, Hansen, Kidwiler, Wendell, Bacon, Tilton Byrne, and Corbett.

Preliminary Plat. A motion was made by Council Member Wendell, seconded by Council Member Tilton Byrne, that the Preliminary Plat for Lots 1-15, Block 1; Lots 1-29, Block 2; Lots 1-26, Block 3; Lots 1-33, Block 4; Tract 1 and Tract 2, all in Fox Run Addition, be approved. The motion carried by the following vote: Yes: 7 - Niemeyer, Hansen, Kidwiler, Wendell, Bacon, Tilton Byrne, and Corbett.

Ordinance 18-010. A public hearing was held on Ordinance 18-010, an Ordinance rezoning the South 245’ of the West 246’ of the East 495’ of the SE ¼ of the SW ¼ Section 3-T109N-R50W within the Joint Jurisdiction Area (1002 West 32nd Street South). A motion was made by Council Member Hansen, seconded by Council Member
Niemeyer, that Ordinance 18-010 be denied. The motion carried by the following vote: Yes: 7 - Niemeyer, Hansen, Kidwiler, Wendell, Bacon, Tilton Byrne, and Corbett.

Rental Housing Inspection Program. Discussion was held on the Rental Housing Program. No action was taken.

Capital Improvement and Community Re-Investment Plans. The City Council reviewed the 2019 Proposed Capital Improvement and Community
Re-Investment Plans.

Deputy Mayor Appointment. A motion was made by Council Member Hansen, seconded by Council Member Niemeyer, to appoint Council Member Mary Kidwiler as the Deputy Mayor, for a term expiring 5/1/2019. The motion carried by the following vote: Yes: 7 - Niemeyer, Hansen, Kidwiler, Wendell, Bacon, Tilton Byrne, and Corbett.

Council Member introduction of topics for future discussion. A motion was made by Council Member Kidwiler, seconded by Council Member Wendell, to explore the possibility of a 4-way stop sign at the intersection of 20th Ave. So. and 17th Ave. So., and to refer this to the Traffic Safety Committee. The motion carried by the following vote: Yes: 7 - Niemeyer, Hansen, Kidwiler, Wendell, Bacon, Tilton Byrne, and Corbett.

Adjourn. A motion was made by Council Member Hansen, seconded by Council Member Kidwiler, to adjourn the meeting at 8:08 p.m. The motion carried by a unanimous vote.

CITY OF BROOKINGS
Keith W. Corbett, Mayor
ATTEST:
Shari Thornes, City Clerk
Facebook Twitter Google Plus Email

Other News in Legal Notices

Bills & Claims - June 2018

Posted on: September 21, 2018

City Council Minutes: 8/28/2018

Posted on: September 13, 2018

Notice of Public Sale

Posted on: September 6, 2018

Bills & Claims: May 2018

Posted on: August 13, 2018

City Council Minutes: 7/10/2018

Posted on: July 25, 2018

City Council Minutes: 6/26/2018

Posted on: July 11, 2018

Resolution 18-026

Posted on: April 25, 2018

Find us on FacebookFollow us on TwitterInstagramRSS